Third Factory/Notes to Poetry

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Posts Tagged ‘Anne Tardos

Attention Span 2009 – Kit Robinson

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Clarice Lispector | The Stream of Life | University of Minnesota | 1989

Benjamin Moser | Why This Life: A Biography of Clarice Lispector | Oxford University| 2009

Carla Harryman | Adorno’s Noise| Essay | 2008

Anne Tardos | I Am You| Salt| 2008

Lyn Hejinian | Saga/Circus | Omnidawn | 2008

Rodney Koeneke | Rules for Drinking Forties | Cy Press | 2009

Michael Gizzi | New Depths of Deadpan| Burning Deck | 2009

Clark Coolidge and Bernadette Mayer | The Cave| Adventures in Poetry | 2009

Andrew Joron | The Sound Mirror | Flood Editions | 2008

Lewis Warsh | Inseparable: Poems, 1995-2005 | Granary Books | 2008

David F. Garcia | Arsenio Rodriguez and the Transnational Flows of Latin Popular Music | Temple University | 2006

More Kit Robinson here.

Attention Span 2009 – Suzanne Stein

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Anne Tardos | I am you | Salt | 2008

Let go of the idea that we’re not sitting on the Beach of the Future. We are.

Steve Benson | Open Clothes | Atelos | 2005

What would it have been to have been myself and to have already have known this?

Michael Gizzi | New Depths of Deadpan | Burning Deck | 2009


Jérôme Bel | Pichet Klunchun and Myself  | YBCA and Dancers Group present: Bay Area debut — One show only! Tue, Mar 3 | Novellus Theater

“French conceptual choreographer Jérôme Bel restages his first encounter with Thai dancer Pichet Klunchun, a master of the classical khon form.” The two sit on chairs on a bare stage, Bel with white MacBook on his lap, Klunchun with nothing. They re-enact. I was drunk with a great seat and a good friend. The curiousness of watching dancers’ bodies attuned for several hours to the performance of redelivering a story of speech, mainly by speaking, was compelling, and speech itself carried movement & physicality of a very other kind than I am used to witnessing in poetry.  I wondered how choreographed the chairs were. What was additionally revealed by the—brief and very occasional—demonstrations of practice was quite moving.

William H. “Holly” Whyte | The Social Life of Small Urban Spaces  | Project for Public Spaces | 1980

David Brazil and Sara Larsen, eds. | TRY! | Every two weeks, ALL YEAR LONG

Michael Anderson | Prate City | working notes of february | 1993
Michael Anderson | Vrille | State One | 1984

These two count as one, partly because I can’t remember which thrilled me more. Please someone tell me what ever happened to Michael Anderson. Many, many thanks to Steve Farmer for the gift of these.

Kit Robinson | A Day Off |  State One | 1985

When I read this book, I feel the same texture of pleasure I experience leaving my workplace early on a pretty day midweek, and going to meet a friend or lie down by the lake, just because I want to; or when I lie down in my cubicle, just because I want to. Also a gift from Steve Farmer.

Michael Scharf | For Kid Rock, Total Freedom | Spectacular Books | 2007

Read this at the end of August 08, at the nude hippie NoCal paradise/freakshow, Harbin Hotsprings, during the first two days—literally, actually—I’d had off in over nine months. This was exactly the return to reading my exhausted, disheveled, alienated little heart needed. Brilliant. I’m going to read it again this August.

Agnes Varda | Le Bonheur | France | 1965

Colorful animals.

More Suzanne Stein here.

Attention Span 2009 – Brandon Brown

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K. Silem Mohammad | Sonnagrams | Unpublished

Kasey’s most recent work complicates any orthodox aesthetics of Flarf. While it surely deploys the twin, cardinal rules of computer aid and histrionically “bad” content, the “Sonnagrams” are for me also work of conceptual translation, doubly or triply nuanced by Mohammad’s own training as a Shakespearean scholar. And this is Shakespeare 2009: “Then do I pray this adage may hold tight / Mohammad sweetens seagull panties right.”

Vanessa Place and Robert Fitterman | Notes on Conceptualism| Ugly Duckling Presse | 2009

The “Notes” themselves an experiment in conceptual collaboration, the NOC were as controversial in summer 2009 as “The Call” Don Denkinger made correctly in the 1985 World Series. I found them extremely generative, useful, and profound.

Sara Larsen and David Brazil | Try!| stapled magazine | 2008-2009

Try! is heir to the rich tradition of Xeroxed, stapled, hand-delivered, often-appearing magazines in the Bay Area. Try! comes out every two weeks—and it really does! It also manages to collect the newest, most vibrant writings that surpass the alienating categories of genre and xenophobic (read: your given “local poetry community” xenophobia) coterie-or-nuthin’ loyalties. I love it. You love it.

Kevin Killian | Action Kylie | In Girum | 2008

I spent the oughts waiting for this book to come out and thanks to In Girum Nocte etc. press it has.

Rob Halpern | Disaster Suites | Palm Press | 2009

Disaster Suites is an outrageous work, the word that has accompanied my living adjacent to and with Rob over the last few years of his writing and reading these magnificent polemics against complicity and the tonal shifts of global capital.

Madeline Gins | What The President Will Say And Do!! | Station Hill | 1984

Not quite a neglectorina and certainly not a new release, but since this is my first “Attention Span” I’ve got to include one of my all-time favorites.

Anne Tardos | I Am You | Salt | 2008

Woah. Seriously. The high point for me probably the sudden photograph of Anne glaring at the reader into the ostensible Macbook camera, literalizing the transgression of the lyric already at work through the bloodbath and beyond.

Dana Ward | The Drought | Open 24 Hours Press | 2009

The drought is over thanks to O24HPress. Fundamentally an advancement of the lyric impulse as mediated not only by “post-avant” poetics (including contemporary post-avant manifestations—Ward’s work stands not as an emblem of some categorical “other” or “hybridity” to some bicameral hegemony of flarfists and conceptualists, but for me it is one of the finest proofs of a world out there) but fulsome ecologies of pop prosody and interpenetrations.

T.I. | Paper Trail | Grand Hustle / Atlantic | 2008

T.I.P.’s sixth studio effort is the shining mainstream hip hop LP of the fiscal year. The classic Clifford approach (the breathless Whitmanian line, the essential Atlantan drawl) inflected by his impending jail sentence—the record’s carpe diem message amplified by its anthemic choruses.

Anne Boyer | odalisqued.blogspot.com | Internet | 2008-2009

The thresholds between Anne’s “books” and her activity on the blog are constantly threatened and renewed. What you get in both places is a contemporary lyric, made in the place where web-based simulacra meets the real-time alienated worker, all the while expressive of Anne’s sui generis aesthetic and integrity.

More Brandon Brown here.

Attention Span – Kristin Prevallet

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Walter Benjamin, trans. Esther Leslie | Walter Benjamin’s Archive: Images, Texts, Signs | Verso | 2007

This beautifully produced book includes lots of snapshots from Benjamin’s archive, including his wooden toy collection and—my favorite—the log he kept of his child Stefan’s funny expressions as he was learning language.

Anne Tardos | I Am You | Salt | 2008

I saw Tardos give a reading from this book at the Bowery Poetry Club sometime last Fall, and thought, this is “beautiful, sexy, hilarious and smart—and most important, it’s REAL!” I got the book and still think the same thing—Tardos give 100% in this book.

Roberto Tejada, Kristin Dykstra, Gabriel Bernal Granados, eds. | Mandorla Nº 10 | 2007

I was thrilled to see the long awaited Mandorla 10, with such carefully edited selections from a wide variety of writers, many of them bi-lingual or presented in translation. For me, it is an anthology of everything I’ve been missing in poetry in the last five years (in terms of both form and content).

Susan Howe | Souls of the Labadie Tract | New Directions | 2007

I love the “lexical landscape” Howe creates in her books, this one in the time of the language of the Labadists, a 17th century Quietist sect.

with me here between us–of
our being together even in
english half english too late

Roberto Bolaño, trans. Natasha Wimmer | The Savage Detectives | Picador | 2007

The tale of two wild poet boys in an On The Road Adventure… at least that’s how the book is characterized by reviewers. It seems to me to be more about the attempt to recover the mythology of poetry and the bohemian ethic of beauty, love, and self-indulgence … remember when we were racy, spontaneous, scandalous, drunk, oversexed, high on ambition, low on productivity? Not me, I came of age in the 90s. But I remember clearly thinking that literature ended with my generation—now that’s youth! Bolaño hits it on the head (sometimes…). In my reading, however, Natasha Wimmer is the true genius here—she’s clearly an amazing writer herself, and the book reads as if it was written in English. Quite a feat, given how raunchy most of the language is.

John Bellamy Foster | Ecology Against Capitalism | Monthly Review | 2002

I caught the tale end of Foster’s talk at a poetry conference at Evergreen College, and was struck by his ecological critique of capitalism, so I bought the book. It has me thinking about how difficult it is to think outside of economic models—Cartesian thinking is economic! Yikes.

Selah Saterstrom | The Pink Institution | Coffee House | 2004

A genre blend of poetry and narrative, the tale comes undone along with all the characters. And the writing is as gorgeous as her voice, reading it.

Rachel Zolf | Human Resources | Coach House | 2007

The back cover suggests reading this book as “the creative potential of salvage” and that’s a pretty good description. This book has a pissed-off ironic tone that reveals how junk-language permeates our everyday life, and there’s no redemption: “Our abstractions stink of pure gibberish.” Ain’t that the truth! This book is definitely not wallowing in abstractions – which is very refreshing. Susquehanna by Dale Smith

Isabelle Garron, trans. Sarah Riggs | Face Before Against | Litmus | 2008

An immersion in language, slow but energetic…. these precise and elegant translations sometimes remind me of Mallarme’s A Tomb for Anatole; others remind me of It Then by Danielle Collobert. Something between elegy and remembrance, body, woman, and thought.

Marina Abramovic | 7 Easy Pieces | Charta | 2007

I paid $60 for this whopper of a book, documenting Abramovic’s reenacted performances by Beuys, Export, Nauman, Pane, Acconci, and Abramovic herself. This woman terrifies me—she builds walls, and then moves through them.

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More Kristin Prevallet here.