Third Factory/Notes to Poetry

art is autonomous

Attention Span 2011 | Astrid Lorange

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Michael Farrell | thempark | Book Thug | 2010

thempark uses Ashbery’s Where Shall I Wander and Hotel Lautréamont as templates. Which is to say, the poems take Ashberian hairpin-bends and fill them with a million nanobots. Some are built from the data of top-40 jams and TV broadcasts, some are the gnats that asphyxiate inside a fruit salad tub, some are outtakes from a doco on Australian tea biscuits and birdsong.

John Paetsch | Hex Nihilo | bas-books | 2011

This is the future: Philadelphia is flanked by the Pacific Ocean, trees are data-sets, everything is smuggling everything else and speeding up a highway, aliens are radios like Spicer told us years ago. The future has two modes: prose so funny it pulls groins; sparse verse that empties guts.

J. Gordon Faylor | Sebaceous Heph | bas-books | 2010

This book has you right on the edge of getting a joke, limbered yet straining for relief, hands about to clap: you’re right there… And then, the syntax does a sneaky, rude little deviation and you’re suffering the immensely cruel pleasure of not-knowing. It’s perfect timing, perfect anti-comedy, and smart in a way that squeezes sebum everywhere.

Kieran Daly | PLAYS / FOR THEATRE | bas-books | 2011

This collection speaks to the performance(s) of: proposition, philosophy and non-philosophy, gift economy, chronic boredom, auto-didacticism, tinkering, naming. You have a window, carpet, access to light, you are in a performance, and it’s that perfect moment where you laugh because it’s truly funny to just be moving your elbow or fixing a pipe.

Chris Alexander | Panda | Truck | 2011

This book was composed collectively by anyone who’s ever described the panda from Kung Fu Panda. This book was curated perfectly by Chris Alexander, who shows the inexhaustible, partial, oriented, polemical, dedicational labour of description. This book is an Everybody’s Autobiography.

Leslie Scalapino | How Phenomena Appear to Unfold | Litmus | 2011

A brilliant collection of essays somewhere between poetics, criticism, event-theory and demonstration of an entirely alien grammar that does everything at once. Scalapino reads and writes into four dimensional cubelets, cubelets that construct truly new things for thinking.

Charles Bernstein | Attack of the Difficult Poems | Chicago  | 2011

Queer pedagogies, queering pedagogies. This book is about professing, teaching, file-sharing and reading-as-writing, because of, and in spite of, all manner of constraint.

Kristen Gallagher | We Are Here | Truck | 2011

One has historically asked oneself: is light made of particles or waves? And the answer, these days, is generally: both! Like, when, you’re dreadfully lost and can’t find your way on a map, you both are and are not located, and you both are and are not moving meaningfully. In this book, you try to find a house, and find something a lot more interesting. As Stein would say, there is no there there! Thankfully!

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Astrid Lorange is a PhD candidate, poet, teacher, researcher, occasional band member and homebrewer from Sydney, Australia. Her books include Eating and Speaking, Minor Dogs and Pussy pussy pussy what what (Au lait day Au lait day).

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